yumfactory:

Brian Dettmer: featured in Hi-Fructose vol.7 

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

"New Books of Knowledge" / altered set of encyclopedias

by American contemporary artist, Brian Dettmer, noted for his alteration of preexisting media, such as old books, to create new, transformed works of visual fine art

Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Dettmer carves one page at a time

(Source: from89)

298 notes

hifructosemag:

Olivia Knapp uses traditional techniques developed by 16th-century master engravers to create pen-and-ink drawings of surreal still lifes. See more on Hi-Fructose.

167 notes

cross-connect:

The Incredible Award Winning Pencil of Adonna Khare

Adonna has been recognized by The Los Angeles Times, U-Press Telegram, and Edward Goldman on NPR

B.A. in Art from California State University Long Beach
M.F.A in Art from CSULB
2007 Award for Distinguished Acheivement in Creative Activity

Permanent collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art as well as numerous private collections throughout the world.  Member of The Drawing Center New York.

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biomedicalephemera:

Our Three (Brain) Mothers

Protecting our brain and central nervous system are the meninges, derived from the Greek term for “membrane”. You may have heard of meningitis - this is when the innermost layer of the meninges swells, often due to infection, and can cause nerve or brain damage, and sometimes death.

There are three meningeal layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. In Latin, “mater” means “mother”. The term comes from the enveloping nature of these membranes, but we later learned how apt it was, because of how protective and essential the meningeal layers are.

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  • The dura mater is the outermost and toughest membrane. Its name means “tough mother”.

The dura is most important for keeping cerebrospinal fluid where it belongs, and for allowing the safe transport of blood to and from the brain. This layer is also water-tight - if it weren’t, our cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would leak out, and our central nervous system would have no cushion! Its leathery qualities mean that even when the skull is broken, more often than not, the dura (and the brain it encases) is not punctured.

  • The arachnoid mater is the middle membrane. Its name means "spider-like mother", because of its web-like nature.

The arachnoid is attached directly to the deep side of the dura, and has small protrusions into the sinuses within the dura, which allows for CSF to return to the bloodstream and not become stagnant. It also has very fine, web-like projections downward, which attach to the pia mater. However, it doesn’t contact the pia mater in the same way as the dura: the CSF flows between the two meningeal layers, in the subarachnoid space. The major superficial blood vessels are on top of the arachnoid, and below the dura.

  • Pia mater is the innermost membrane, which follows the folds (sulci) of the brain and spinal cord most closely. Its name means “tender mother”.

The pia is what makes sure the CSF stays between the meninges, and doesn’t just get absorbed into the brain or spinal cord. It also allows for new CSF from the ventricles to be shunted into the subarachnoid space, and provides pathways for blood vessels to nourish the brain. While the pia mater is very thin, it is water-tight, just like the dura mater. The pia is also the primary blood-brain barrier, making sure that no plasma proteins or organic molecules penetrate into the CSF. 

Because of this barrier, medications which need to reach the brain or meninges must be administered directly into the CSF.

Images:
Anatomy: Practical and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1909.

716 notes

humansofnewyork:

"I’m writing a play about the nature of truth, and how difficult it is to convey the truth when everybody is speaking a different language. For example, the word ‘terrorist’ and the word ‘freedom fighter’ are used to refer to the exact same people at the exact same time. With everyone speaking differently, truth is almost impossible to agree upon. Yet believing in the existence of truth is the only thing that keeps us from devolving into tribal warfare. Because without the existence of truth, the person who is most powerful becomes the person who is right."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m writing a play about the nature of truth, and how difficult it is to convey the truth when everybody is speaking a different language. For example, the word ‘terrorist’ and the word ‘freedom fighter’ are used to refer to the exact same people at the exact same time. With everyone speaking differently, truth is almost impossible to agree upon. Yet believing in the existence of truth is the only thing that keeps us from devolving into tribal warfare. Because without the existence of truth, the person who is most powerful becomes the person who is right."

6,882 notes

humansofnewyork:

"One of the magical things about theater is that it gathers a crowd of people in a quiet space, and each member of the audience gets to see how people respond differently to the different things being said on stage. The person next to you will laugh at something that you’d never think of laughing at, and you’ll get a glimpse into all the different ways of viewing the world. Unfortunately, so much theater today is less nuanced. It gives you a large dose of one way of thinking, in hopes of getting as many of the same type of people into the theater as possible."

humansofnewyork:

"One of the magical things about theater is that it gathers a crowd of people in a quiet space, and each member of the audience gets to see how people respond differently to the different things being said on stage. The person next to you will laugh at something that you’d never think of laughing at, and you’ll get a glimpse into all the different ways of viewing the world. Unfortunately, so much theater today is less nuanced. It gives you a large dose of one way of thinking, in hopes of getting as many of the same type of people into the theater as possible."

7,218 notes

artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

James Fenner | on Tumblr (USA)

James Fenner is a freelance illustrator who has studied Media Art and Animation at The Art Institute Of Portland, in Oregon. His illustration is a harmonious mix of graphite and digital techniques, distinguished by its dreamlike approach and whimsical sets. Fenner is an aspiring editorial illustrator, most of his pieces tell their own tale, and the characters he depicts are more protagonists of a larger story than simple subjects. (cf. Fresh&Bold)

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more James Fenner | artist found at septagonstudios]

6,215 notes